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Archived posts: Exhibitions

Under the Same Sun: Art from Latin America Today

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Yesterday we popped over to the wonderful South London Gallery in Camberwell to check out the preview of their latest show: Under the Same Sun: Art from Latin America Today.

The exhibition is the first from the gallery to be shown across two sites: their main building, and their new space just across the road, the former Peckham Road Fire Station.

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The show brings together highlights from the Guggenheim’s collection of recently acquired Latin American art, including installation, painting, performance, photography, sculpture and video.

Here are just a few of those:

Over in the Fire Station, Jonathas de Adrade’s piece, Posters for the Museum of the Man of the Northeast (below) features 77 fake posters advertising the real Museum of the Northeastern Man in Recife, Brazil. Viewers are invited to move the posters around – effectively to rehang the room. Go on, unleash your internal curator.

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Rivane Neuenschwander’s piece Mapa-Múndi/BR, below, invites viewers to select a postcard and send it to someone. Each of the postcards shows somewhere in Brazil that is named after somewhere not in Brazil: bars, churches and stores with names like Alaska, Baghdad, China and Las Vegas (a motel).

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Back in the main gallery, Amalia Pica’s piece A ∩ B ∩ C features large primary coloured acrylic shapes stacked against the gallery walls, which are presented in a performance piece each week (Saturdays at 1pm).

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The catalogue blurb for the piece says that the shapes: “refer to 1970s Argentina. During this period, set theory was forbidden from being taught in elementary classes, in response to a concern that it might ultimately prompt citizens to conspire against the military junta. In A ∩ B ∩ C, Pica invites performers to manipulate translucent colored shapes, producing new configurations that, emancipated from the historical anecdote, use abstraction and intersection as an invitation to reimagine forms of collaboration and community.”

So essentially these are rebellious Venn diagrams made real.

The show was previously on at the Guggenheim in NYC, and at the Museo Jumex in Mexico City. It’s part of the Guggenheim UBS MAP Global Art Initiative, which supports contemporary art and artists from three regions – South & Southeast Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East & North Africa — through acquisitions, curatorial residencies, exhibitions, and educational programmes.

The show alone is worth a visit, but there’s the extra incentive of getting to take a look at the gallery’s new site, the Grade II listed former Peckham Road Fire Station.

It’s just a few doors down from the main gallery, across the road next to the current fire station. Donated to the gallery by an anonymous benefactor, only the ground floor is currently open, and it’s only open for the duration of this show, before a full refit begins ahead of the re-opening in 2018. So it’s worth getting in there for a look while you can.

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The show opens tomorrow, and runs until 4 September 2016.

Designology at the London Transport Museum

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We nipped along to the London Transport Museum recently to catch their brand new show, Designology.

The exhibition is part of their London by Design Season, celebrating 150 years of design heritage. As part of this, they’ve already installed a new permanent gallery, London by Design, within the museum. This temporary show adds to that, displaying a selection of bits and bobs that illustrate how the design process works within various strands of London’s transport network.

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It’s a slightly cramped show, and the display can feel a little home-made at times, but there are some real gems on display.

Our favourite was the set of archival material from when the London Underground’s iconic Johnston typeface was updated and turned into New Johnston by Eiichi Kono at Banks & Miles. (This provides the perfect complement to the Johnston exhibition currently on at Ditchling Museum of Art + Craft.)

It was partly some indecisive crotches that prompted the renovation. Here’s typographer Watler Tracy RDI (at the time, recently retired, but who had worked on some Johnston revisions in the mid ’70s) to explain:

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At the top of this post you can see a page of Eiichi’s preparation for a presentation to London Transport in 1980. It shows the original range of Johnston typefaces. The note at the very top reads: ‘There are six variations but only medium and bold romans are available for LT’s general printed publicity.’ The faces are: Johnston Bold, Medium, Light, Bold Condensed, Medium Condensed and Medium Italic. Here are some of Eiichi’s illuminating notes:

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Brilliant stuff.

Here’s how New Johnston is specified in the current Tfl Design Standards:

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You can read more about the design of New Johnston in this fascinating piece by Eiichi for the Edward Johnston Foundation. And Eiichi will be giving a talk about New Johnston at the museum on Tuesday 7 June.

Also on show at the exhibition, you can see David Gentleman’s original wood blocks for his stunning murals on the Northern Line platforms at Charing Cross.

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Here’s how the print from that block looks:

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And a poster showing how the artwork appears on the platforms (the brown lines on the artwork represent benches):

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And of course, there is a vast array of lovely signs, photographs and ephemera:

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There’s also a fantastic short film showing how bus destination blinds are manufactured… but you’ll have to visit the show to see that!

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Related posts:

London Transport Museum Acton Depot

Poster Art 150